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GASPAR YANGA PDF

Spain (present-day Mexico), in , Gaspar Yanga led the escape of his fellow slaves into nearby mountains. There they lived for nearly 40 years, arming and. The heritage of Africans in Mexico after Christopher Columbus is a rarely explored topic in the history books of the Americas. Gaspar Yanga is one of the. Not keeping up with technology is an excellent path to becoming a slave. Happens to the best of humans. It happened to Gaspar Yanga, and.

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Mexico and its people have always been motivated by freedom and the overall well-being of the community.

Sugar plantations in the coastal state of Veracruz had the most concentration of enslaved people brought from several parts of the African continent. After Africans arrived in Mexico, they were immediately introduced to different plantations and other work environments, with scarce provisions and no rights or basic human needs.

Brought to Mexico in chains, Gaspar Yanga and his followers staged a bloody rebellion

During these times of desperation, a particular individual stood out as one of janga most important founders of one of the very first fights for the abolition of slavery ever recorded but unfortunately forgotten —GASPAR YANGA.

Gaspar Yanga was one of the first black liberators in the Americas. He led one of the most successful slave rebellions. He was an African prince!

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Yanga was one gaspzr the many enslaved people brought over from West Africa and forced to work in the Spanish sugar plantations in New Spain Mexico. InYanga led a slave revolt and escaped with a group of followers into the mountainous terrain surrounding Veracruz. They went to a place called Pico de Orizaba or Star Mountain which is the highest mountain in Mexico and part of the Olmec region.

Brought to Mexico in chains, Gaspar Yanga and his followers staged a bloody rebellion

The Olmecs, who were of African origin, were one of the first civilizations in Mesoamerica, back before the Aztecs and Mayans. Yanga knew about the Olmec tradition and looked for this area because he knew he would be safe with people of his color.

Yanga and his people built a small marooned colony. These colonies were called maroon because they were made up of African runaways who escaped from slavery in the Americas and formed independent settlements or joined with the indigenous people.

Yanga and his people survived more than 30 years through farming. They also waged a campaign against Spanish colonial rule, raiding caravans that carried goods and other supplies between Veracruz and Mexico City.

The Spanish authorities decided to take control of this territory again in Finally, the Spanish had no other choice than to accept the terms laid by Yanga. Five decades later inafter the Mexican independence, Gaspar Yanga was recognized as a hero of Mexico thanks to Vicente Riva Palacio, the grandson of the Afro-Mexican President Vicente Guerrero, who gathered the first information about him.

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Yanga: An African Prince, Mexican Hero, and Freedom Leader

Gspar painting by Aydee Rodriquez, a renowned artist from the Costa Chica area depicts Yanga with the chains of slavery, a sword for the fight for freedom, and a book for education and liberty. This article is part of their final examination for an English writing class taught by the editor of this publication.

Gaspar Yanga and Blacks in Mexico: Yanga is Recognized as a National Hero Five decades later inafter the Mexican independence, Gaspar Yanga was recognized as a hero of Mexico thanks to Vicente Riva Palacio, the grandson of the Afro-Mexican President Vicente Guerrero, who gathered the first information about him.

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